Full-scale deformation measurements of a wind turbine rotor in comparison with aeroelastic simulations

Lehnhoff, Stephanie; Gómez González, Alejandro; Seume, Jörg R.

The measurement of deformation and vibration of wind turbine rotor blades in field tests is a substantial part of the validation of aeroelastic codes. This becomes highly important for modern rotors as the rotor size increases, which comes along with structural changes, resulting in very high flexibility and coupling between different vibration modes. However, performing full-scale field measurements for rotor blade deformation is not trivial and requires high temporal and spatial resolution. A promising deformation measurement technique is based on an optical method called digital image correlation (DIC). Recently, DIC measurements on a Siemens Gamesa SWT-4.0-130 test turbine were performed on the tip of all blades in combination with marker tracking at the hub for the first time with synchronised measurement of the inflow conditions by a ground-based lidar. As the turbine was additionally equipped with strain gauges in the blade root of all blades, the DIC results can be directly compared to the actual prevailing loads to validate the measurement method. In the end, an example for a comparison of the measured deformations and torsion with aeroelastic simulations is shown in the time and frequency domain. All in all, DIC shows very good agreement with comparative measurements and simulations, which shows that it is a suitable method for measurement of deformation and torsion of multi-megawatt wind turbine rotor blades.

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Lehnhoff, Stephanie / Gómez González, Alejandro / Seume, Jörg R.: Full-scale deformation measurements of a wind turbine rotor in comparison with aeroelastic simulations. 2020. Copernicus Publications.

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