The Canadian Hydrological Model (CHM) v1.0: a multi-scale, multi-extent, variable-complexity hydrological model – design and overview

Marsh, Christopher B.; Pomeroy, John W.; Wheater, Howard S.

Despite debate in the rainfall–runoff hydrology literature about the merits of physics-based and spatially distributed models, substantial work in cold-region hydrology has shown improved predictive capacity by including physics-based process representations, relatively high-resolution semi-distributed and fully distributed discretizations, and the use of physically identifiable parameters that require limited calibration. While there is increasing motivation for modelling at hyper-resolution (inline-formula< 1 km) and snowdrift-resolving scales (inline-formula≈ 1 to 100 m), the capabilities of existing cold-region hydrological models are computationally limited at these scales.

Here, a new distributed model, the Canadian Hydrological Model (CHM), is presented. Although designed to be applied generally, it has a focus for application where cold-region processes play a role in hydrology. Key features include the ability to do the following: capture spatial heterogeneity in the surface discretization in an efficient manner via variable-resolution unstructured meshes; include multiple process representations; change, remove, and decouple hydrological process algorithms; work at both a point and spatially distributed scale; scale to multiple spatial extents and scales; and utilize a variety of forcing fields (boundary and initial conditions). This paper focuses on the overall model philosophy and design, and it provides a number of cold-region-specific features and examples.

Zitieren

Zitierform:

Marsh, Christopher B. / Pomeroy, John W. / Wheater, Howard S.: The Canadian Hydrological Model (CHM) v1.0: a multi-scale, multi-extent, variable-complexity hydrological model – design and overview. 2020. Copernicus Publications.

Zugriffsstatistik

Gesamt:
Volltextzugriffe:
Metadatenansicht:
12 Monate:
Volltextzugriffe:
Metadatenansicht:

Grafik öffnen

Rechte

Rechteinhaber: Christopher B. Marsh et al.

Nutzung und Vervielfältigung:

Export